DECORATIVE ARTS & COLLECTABLES

Session One: Saturday 27 February 11.00am AEDT
Decorative Arts
(Lots 1-683)
001-113 Silver
114-205 Porcelain & Ceramics
206-265 Glass
266-370 Decorative Arts – General
371-373 Antiquities
374-553 Chinese & Asian Art
554-643 Furniture
644-658 Rugs, Carpets & Textiles
659-683 Lamps & Lighting

Session Two: Sunday  28 February 11.00am AEDT
Decorative Arts
(Lots 684-958)
684-726 Clocks & Timepieces
727-854 Jewellery, Watches & Luxury Accessories
855-940 Paintings & Artworks
941-949 Photographs
950-953 Taxidermy
954-958 Tribal Artefacts & Artworks

Collectables
(Lots 959-1304)
959-1006 General
1007-1045 Vintage & Antique Tools
1046-1054 Musical Instruments
1055-1084 Radios and Gramophones
1085-1112 Books & Historical Documents
1113-1115 Exhibitions
1116-1128 Military
1129-1304 Models & Toys (Including from a Private Collection, Melbourne)

 

Dear Clients and Friends,

We’re delighted to take this opportunity to say hello, once again, to the many of you around Australia and around the world, who have been asking us when this auction would be available. Our International Decorative Arts & Collectables sales are always popular, so we look forward to hearing from you after you’ve flipped through the catalogue.

Together we continue to survive, thrive and confront the challenges brought into our lives by Covid-19 since this time last year. Thankyou to all of you who have asked after our health and the health of our families and friends. While we have all had to make sacrifices and modifications to our lives – especially our work and leisure – and for those with children at school or later studies the changes have been even more dramatic, I can’t help feeling that the new year brings a sense of optimism and hope that we’ve turned the corner. With vaccines becoming increasingly available, let’s hope we are truly on the way back to “normal”, not just “Covid-normal”.

We are often asked if we have a favourite lot in an auction. It’s an interesting question, especially considering how lucky we are, handling more than 10,000 lots in a typical year! Actually, it’s not until about now in the cycle of an auction – the moment when we finally see the complete catalogue for the first time – that the fruits of our weeks of effort can be seen in totality. Several of us worked on this offering and while we often consult each other, it’s the completed catalogue which enables us to see just what we’ve all been working on. Happily, the sum of the parts creates a greater whole, and I know we are all very proud of the catalogues we prepare on behalf of our vendors.

So, back to the question about favourite lots; these are a few of ours:

Firstly perhaps, a few words about our selection for the front (and back!) covers: Lot 899, an oil painting by German artist, Ernst Hugo von Stenglin, who was at his creative peak between 1890 and 1910, may be a surprise to some. It’s not “sexy”, the artist is not “hot” and it was created during a period when many artists were striving for new horizons, new formats and controversy was courted as a way of attracting attention. Von Stenglin, whose work is rarely seen in Australia, preferred to focus on his craft and on creating images that gave him pleasure. His work is traditional, often charming and beautifully observed and we just love this example. We like to use our covers to draw attention to fine works, not just expensive items, so we hope those of you who can come to the viewing days will look out for this picture, as well as Lot 898, by Rudolf Hellgrewe, another German artist of the same period, which came to us from the same home.

While talking about artworks, another of our favourites in this catalogue, is Lot 178, a pottery plaque from a small edition by Pablo Picasso. It’s always nice to see something different from this great artist and this piece is in wonderful condition as well as being a delightful subject. The pair of vases that comprise Lot 379 have similar characteristics in that they are also in wonderful condition and demonstrate the fine art of Chinese ceramics to perfection. The painter has created beautiful renditions of objects and plants and remarkably, the pair has been kept together, just the way they were intended to be enjoyed in the first place.

We have a soft spot for any piece of furniture with Edwin Godwin’s touch evident, and Lot 593 is a charming example. His incorporation of Japanese delicacy and style elements into his designs means they are even more sought after today than they were 150 years ago, when he created them. This is a very affordable and functional piece which would look good in the most contemporary of settings.

I can’t go past Lot 685, the impressive French gilt mantel clock surmounted by a charming scene of a mother reading to her son. A classic in beautiful condition just looking for the right mantel piece on which to spend the next 50 or 60 years. And what about Lot 1047, the 17th Century violin? If you’re a good violinist, please bring your bow to the viewings and play for us, the tone of this instrument is sublime.

Finally, (because I have to stop somewhere and there are more than 1300 items in the catalogue!) I must mention the fantastic range of vintage and antique wood-working tools (Lots 1007 – 1045) and the extensive collection of toys, models and other children’s delights from a Melbourne collector who never really grew up, thank goodness, (Lots 1129 – 1304).

We hope you’ll find your own favourites and we look forward to helping you with your bids and your questions.

Stay healthy and enjoy your collecting,
With best wishes from all of us at Leski Auctions.